Aloha! Welcome to Our Journey, my blog about life in the South Pacific.
Life is full of new and fantastic experiences, especially when you live in a tropical paradise!
~ your friend, Loke

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What South Pacific county is just south of the equator, has more than 600 islands and more than 800 languages? Papua New Guinea! It is one of the most culturally diverse places in the world. It’s also one of the most beautiful! One of the most fascinating places I’ve been to in PNG is a place called Rabaul. This is a town in the shadow of something very scary: a volcano! Mt Tavurvur is an active, smoke-spewing mountain. But does that stop »

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oceania

Aloha, friends! Now if there is one thing I get asked all the time, it’s this: What is Oceania? We all know where the South Pacific is — that one’s easy. Sometimes when people say Oceania, they mean the South Pacific. But I’ll give you a hint: Oceania bigger than you think! Oceania is made up of four areas: Polynesia, Micronesia, Malaysia and Melanesia. It includes Australia, the Philippines and Easter Islands (or Rapa Nui). Oceania »

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What do you imagine when you hear surfing? I bet you get images of Hawai’i, Waikiki and Maui. While surfing did originate in Hawai’i, it can now be found all over the world! My friend Kokio is a super enthusiastic surfer — he spends all his free time carving up the waves, as he says! The other day he told me about surfing in a place that I’d never thought of as a surfing spot: The Solomon Islands! The Solomon Islands is an island »

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2011
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Have you ever heard of a country called Niue? If you haven’t, don’t worry — most people know very little about this very little Pacific island country. It is only about 100 square miles, northeast of New Zealand. Niue is sometimes known as the Rock of Polynesia, or just The Rock. However, there’s more to it than just a rock! There are only about 1400 people living in Niue. The language they speak? Niuean, of course! There are »

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